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Female Athletes read this!

Posted on July 20, 2016 at 9:55 AM

Wearable Reduces ACL Injuries in Female Study Subjects

Published on July 11, 2016

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photo-uefa-female-soccer-championship-2009-italy-hungary-image10426435

Technology may offer a way to control the significantly higher occurrences of ACL injury among young women who play soccer. A new report shows that using a wearable neuromuscular (WNM) as part of a training protocol helped substantially reduce ACL injuries in recent testing.

 

According to the study, presented recently at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, Colo, athletes who used the devices in combination with a regular training program showed functional improvements.

 

“Our study showed that training with a wearable neuromuscular (WNM) device improved postural control in athletes, without limiting performance,” says Michael John Decker, PhD, from the University of Denver in Denver, in a media release from AOSSM. “Moreover, no athletes in the study experienced an ACL injury during training or over the course of the following season.”

 

In the study involving 79 elite youth and collegiate female soccer players (ages 12 to 25), participants trained with a WNM device that applied bilateral, topical pressure to the medial quadriceps and hamstring muscles. The preseason training program with the device lasted 7 to 9 weeks, and consisted of strength and conditioning exercises and on-field team practices.

 

“Research has shown female soccer players have a three times greater risk of ACL injury compared to males, yet only a small portion of soccer coaches are currently utilizing ACL injury risk reduction programs,” Decker states in the release. “We hope these devices offer coaches a practical means to overcome participation barriers, opening the door for more organizations and teams to implement similar programs.”

 

[Source(s): American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, Science Daily]

To all female athletes!

Posted on July 20, 2016 at 9:50 AM

Wearable Reduces ACL Injuries in Female Study Subjects

Published on July 11, 2016

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photo-uefa-female-soccer-championship-2009-italy-hungary-image10426435

Technology may offer a way to control the significantly higher occurrences of ACL injury among young women who play soccer. A new report shows that using a wearable neuromuscular (WNM) as part of a training protocol helped substantially reduce ACL injuries in recent testing.

 

According to the study, presented recently at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs, Colo, athletes who used the devices in combination with a regular training program showed functional improvements.

 

“Our study showed that training with a wearable neuromuscular (WNM) device improved postural control in athletes, without limiting performance,” says Michael John Decker, PhD, from the University of Denver in Denver, in a media release from AOSSM. “Moreover, no athletes in the study experienced an ACL injury during training or over the course of the following season.”

 

In the study involving 79 elite youth and collegiate female soccer players (ages 12 to 25), participants trained with a WNM device that applied bilateral, topical pressure to the medial quadriceps and hamstring muscles. The preseason training program with the device lasted 7 to 9 weeks, and consisted of strength and conditioning exercises and on-field team practices.

 

“Research has shown female soccer players have a three times greater risk of ACL injury compared to males, yet only a small portion of soccer coaches are currently utilizing ACL injury risk reduction programs,” Decker states in the release. “We hope these devices offer coaches a practical means to overcome participation barriers, opening the door for more organizations and teams to implement similar programs.”

 

[Source(s): American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, Science Daily]

NEW MUSCLE FOUND!

Posted on February 23, 2016 at 11:40 AM

For any years we have thought anatomy as a completed science. Aparrently NOT! Researchers have found a new muscle! 


 

Introducing The Tensor Vastus Intermedius!

Introducing a new muscle almost as elusive as the legendary Bigfoot. In 2014 it was the anterolateral ligament this year it is the tensor vastus intermedius I wonder what will come next!

 

This is a New Muscle.

A research paper release in the Journal Clinical Anatomy details a newly described muscle as part of the quadriceps. This muscle lies between the vastus lateralis and the vastus intermedius, and is named the tensor vastus intermedius.

 

Found on All 26 Bodies

Researchers were able to identify this muscles on all 26 of the cadavers in the study; it was also determined that the tensor vastus intermedius is supplied by independent muscular and vascular branches of the femoral nerve and lateral circumflex femoral artery.

 

What are the Implications?

As an anatomy nerd this new scientific discovery caught my eye. Even though the implications for therapists will likely be minimal due to the relative size of the muscle. This new discovery serves as a reminder that our knowledge of the human form and function is constantly evolving.





Naggin' Knee Cap Pain?

Posted on September 26, 2014 at 9:20 PM

Ever feel that horrible stabbing pain underneath your knee cap (patella) whle trying to go up or even worse DOWN stairs? This may be a condition known as patellofemoral syndrome or chondromalacia patella. What the heck does that mean? Traditionally these are the diagnoses that describe a "fraying" of the cartilage on the back of the patella (knee cap). What causes this? While there are many debates on what causes this condition there are some general agreements. Certain anatomical variations in morphology( AKA the way we are born and put together) can cause the patella to track laterally to the outside of the groove it normally sits in. This coupled with weakness in certain quad and hip muscles then give rise to pain referral patterns that cause this pain to persist. These same muscles can also cause your knee to "lock up" or feel as though your knee may "give way" while walking or going down or up stairs. 


How do we treat this you may ask? The Bluegrass Doctors of Physical Therapy, provide an innovative, comprehenisive treatment approach that involves the most effective manual therapy, taping, dry needling and strengthening techniques that can have your knee pain under control in as few as 2 visits! 


To find out if that nagging knee pain you have been having is Chondromalacia Patella contact us today or book your initial evaluation online!